Do not go gentle into that good night

I want to remind you about a poem. You have surely heard a line from this work by famous Welsh poet Thomas Dylan (Oct 27, 1914 — Nov 9, 1953). This is a true manifest of immortalism. Especially touching is the fact that it was written by Dylan for his dying father... I imagine that if cryonics was already invented by that time, Thomas Dylan would probably cryopreserve his father...

Портрет Томаса Дилана

It seems Dylan was a natural-born immortalist — someone who simply cannot accept the power of death. But he himself died shortly before Julian Huxley invented the term "transhumanism".

Curiously, there is even a film based on Thomas Dylan's play "Doctor and devils" starring Timothy Dalton. The film is based on a real story about a scientist buying fresh corpses for anatomical research despite suspicions that those people were murdered. 

 

 

Do not go gentle into that good night,
Old age should burn and rave at close of day;
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Though wise men at their end know dark is right,
Because their words had forked no lightning they
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright
Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight,
And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way,
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight
Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

And you, my father, there on the sad height,
Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I pray.
Do not go gentle into that good night.
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.